7 Myths About Mental Health

7 Myths About Mental Health

If you’re reading this article, chances are good that you or someone you know has a mental health condition. But sometimes there are myths about what these illnesses are, how they affect people and what treatments are available. Here’s a list of eight common misperceptions about mental illness:

Myth No. 1: People with a mental health condition are not reliable and can’t manage money.

8 myths about mental health

Myth No. 1: People with a mental health condition are not reliable and can’t manage money.

It’s true that many people with mental health conditions are more likely to be victims of financial abuse than the general population, but this doesn’t mean they can’t manage their finances effectively if given the right tools and support. In fact, it’s possible for anyone who has ever struggled with depression or another form of mental illness to successfully use money management techniques such as budgeting and saving—and even thrive in their careers if they put in the effort!

Myth No. 2: People with a mental health condition are more likely to be violent.

Myth No. 2: People with a mental health condition are more likely to be violent.

While it’s true that people with mental health issues can be victims of violence, there are also many who become perpetrators as well. In fact, according to the U.S Department of Justice (DOJ), about one-third of all violent crimes are committed by individuals who claim some type of emotional disturbance or personality disorder—and almost half involve individuals who have been diagnosed with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. Do keep in mind that this article states that these individuals “claim”, therefore we are unable to confirm or deny.

Myth No. 3: People with a mental health condition cannot manage their own care.

Myth No. 3: People with a mental health condition cannot manage their own care.

This myth is based on the belief that people with mental illness are not capable of making decisions about their own care, and therefore, have no choice but to rely on others to make decisions for them. In reality, however, people with a mental illness can and do manage their own care just as well as anyone else in society—and often better than most!

self care and myths about mental health

Myth No. 4: People with a mental health condition can’t hold down jobs or go to school.

  • People with a mental health condition can’t hold down jobs or go to school.

This myth is based on the belief that people with mental health conditions are too sick to work or study, and therefore should be given special treatment. However, there are many ways you can use your condition in order to get the most out of your life and work life at the same time. For example:

  • You might have difficulty concentrating due to depression or another mood disorder; this may mean that you need more breaks during the day or less overtime than other employees would like (for example). If so, it’s important for employers not only understand this but also realize that they need their employees’ input when making decisions about how best serve their needs as well as those of their customers/clients/patients etc.

Myth No. 5: Mental health conditions come and go as people choose, so they could get better if they just try harder.

The idea that mental health conditions are something you can just snap out of, or a character flaw like being lazy or stubborn, is one of the most damaging myths around. If you’ve ever been told this by someone close to you, it’s time to let these people go.

Mental illness is not a character flaw: People with mental health conditions aren’t weak or stupid—they simply struggle with their emotions and behaviors in different ways than others do. For example, someone who suffers from depression may feel worthless and hopeless often; instead of trying harder at schoolwork or work tasks (which would be considered normal), she avoids them altogether until she feels better again. Another person may have bipolar disorder—his moods swing between extremes such as mania (feeling grandiose) followed by depression (feeling depressed).

You’re not alone and this shouldn’t be something that you struggle with on your own. You’re not too broken beyond repair, and just like anyone else, you deserve to feel okay. Seeking therapy, even if you’re not to fond of it, can be extremely helpful and help you start healing past traumas alongside receiving tools to help you manage your condition.

⇨ Related: Benefits Of Online Therapy

Myth No. 6: Mental health conditions are easy to diagnose and treat.

Myth No. 6: Mental health conditions are easy to diagnose and treat.

While there is no cure for mental illness, many people do find treatment helpful when they need it. But diagnosis is not an easy process, especially for individuals who experience symptoms that aren’t immediately recognizable as signs of a problem. In addition, even if you know what symptoms indicate your own particular issue, there may be other factors at play—such as a major life event or stressor—that could cause similar symptoms in someone else with no personal connection to yours at all. And while some sources of stress can be avoided through lifestyle changes like eating healthier foods or exercising regularly; others aren’t so easily avoided at all: trauma experienced during childhood can leave lasting effects on adulthood that affect one’s ability to cope with everyday life situations such as work demands or social interactions with friends/family members.

myths about mental health

Myth No. 7: Addictions aren’t related to mental health issues — they’re habits people can’t break if they have enough willpower or discipline.

Myth No. 8: Addictions aren’t related to mental health issues — they’re habits people can’t break if they have enough willpower or discipline

The truth is, addiction isn’t a choice. It’s a disease that affects millions of people around the world, and it can happen to anyone regardless of their personal characteristics or circumstances. Addiction isn’t always intentional; some people may be trying to avoid negative consequences by using drugs or alcohol, but others will find themselves in situations where they need help managing their substance use disorder (SUD).

Addiction is not a character flaw or personal weakness; it requires treatment from professionals who understand how SUDs work and how best to treat them safely through medication and therapy sessions. If you think your friend, family member, significant other, or yourself, might have an issue with substance abuse, don’t hesitate asking for help!

Knowing what’s not true about mental illness is the first step toward recovery and understanding the illness itself

The first step toward recovery and understanding the illness itself is knowing what’s not true about mental health.

  • Mental health is not a weakness, but a strength. When we think of people with mental illnesses, we often associate them with weakness or poor character—but this couldn’t be further from the truth. People suffering from any type of stress-related disorder are stronger than ever before: they’ve learned how to cope with their symptoms and make healthy choices in life so they can get back on track as quickly as possible.
  • You don’t choose your own problems. Did you know that most people who suffer from depression want help? While it may seem like choosing when or where something happens would be helpful sometimes (e.g., “I’m going out tonight! I’ll pick up dinner at Whole Foods”), it doesn’t work like that at all–and even if there were some way for us all to control our lives 100% every time…it wouldn’t work anyway because no one has enough power over anything except themselves (and even then).

Conclusion

We hope you’ve enjoyed learning about these misconceptions and myths about mental health. It’s important to know the truth about mental illness, so that we can be more supportive of those who are struggling with their conditions. By sharing this information with others, you may be able to help someone else understand what it means to have a mental health condition.

4 thoughts on “7 Myths About Mental Health”

  1. I totally agree with all the 7 points that you are making on mental health. It sure can be a struggle sometimes to survive, but that doesn’t mean at all that because I have a mental issue, that I couldn’t organize my life, make money, or that I can’t have a good life, despite the struggles of having a mental health issue! Thanks for busting these myths

    1. Having a mental health condition doesn’t imply that a person is not able to complete daily achievements. I think it’s time to break that stigma and normalize people being open about their struggles. I hope you’re managing alright. 

  2. Indeed, there are lots of myths about mental health. People show in the way they treat a person with that condition. My sister suffered from mental health issues; I have seen how she was treated by friends and colleagues who were very close to her. Generally, people need to be educated about mental health, as lack of understanding can worsen the illness. She has improved but not fully recovered. I can say that she is on her way to recovery. When she got ill because of how she was treated- she lost her confidence and became depressed. It was difficult for her to accept, hence she refused to seek treatment. Now all of that is behind her and she is currently seeking employment.

    1. So happy that your sister has taken that step towards improving her life in the best way she feels like it can fit her. Mental illnesses can’t be cured. There’s no magic cure for any illness, but there is treatment. Treatment goes such a long way when improving an individuals life. Thank you for sharing your experience. Hope your sister is doing so much better and on a great path towards healing.

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